Home > General Knowledge, History > 79/365 – Madurai Nayak Dynasty

79/365 – Madurai Nayak Dynasty

The Madurai Nayaks or Nayak Dynasty of Madurai were rulers of a region comprising most of modern-day Tamil Nadu, India, with Madurai as their capital. The Nayak reign was an era noted for its achievement in arts, cultural and administrative reforms, revitalization of temples previously ransacked by the Delhi Sultans, and inauguration of a unique architectural style.

The dynasty consisted of 13 rulers, of whom 9 were kings, 2 were queens, and 2 were joint-kings. The most notable of these were the king, Tirumalai Nayak, and the queen, Rani Mangammal. Foreign trade was conducted mainly with the Dutch and the Portuguese, as the British and the French had not yet made inroads in the region.

 

Official language: Telugu, Tamil
Capitals: Madurai 1529 – 1616, Tiruchirapalli1616–1634, again Madurai 1634 – 1695, Tiruchirapalli1695-1716,Madurai 1716–1736.
Government: Governors, then Monarchy
Preceding States: Pandiyan Dynasty, Delhi Sultanate, Vijayanagara Empire
Succeeding States: Nawab of Carnatic, British India, Kingdom of Mysore (for Dindigul, Coimbatore, Salem provinces)
Breakaway States: Ramnad, Pudukkottai and Sivaganga (from Ramnad)

Madurai Nayak Rulers
Viswanatha Nayak 1529—1563
Kumara Krishnappa Nayak 1563—1573
Joint Rulers Group I 1573—1595
Joint Rulers Group II 1595—1602
Muttu Krishnappa Nayak 1602—1609
Muttu Virappa Nayak 1609—1623
Tirumalai Nayak 1623—1659
Muthu Alakadri Nayak 1659—1662
Chokkanatha Nayak 1662—1682
Rangakrishna Muthu Virappa Nayak 1682—1689
Rani Mangammal‡ 1689—1704
Vijaya Ranga Chokkanatha Nayak 1704—1731
Queen Meenakshi 1731—1736

Capitals
Madurai 1529—1616
Tiruchirapalli 1616—1634
Madurai 1634—1665
Tiruchirapalli 1665—1736

Major Forts
Madurai 72 Bastion Fort
Tiruchirapalli Rock Fort
Dindigul Fort
Thirunelvelli Fort

Palaces
Thirumalai Nayak Mahal, Madurai
Chokkanatha Nayak Palace/Durbar Hall, Tiruchirapalli
Rani Mangammal Tamukkam palace Madurai

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Categories: General Knowledge, History
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