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260/365 – Prawn

Prawns are decapod crustaceans of the suborder Dendrobranchiata. There are 540 extant species, in seven families, and a fossil record extending back to the Devonian.

They differ from other, similar crustaceans, such as Caridea (shrimp) and Stenopodidea (boxer shrimp) by the branching form of the gills and by the fact that they do not brood their eggs, but release them directly into the water.

They may reach a length of over 330 millimetres (13 in) and a mass of 450 grams (1.0 lb), and are widely fished and farmed for human consumption.

Shrimp and prawns  

While in biological terms shrimps and prawns belong to different suborders of Decapoda, they are very similar in appearance.

In commercial farming and fisheries, the terms “shrimp” and “prawn” are often used interchangeably.

However, recent aquaculture literature increasingly uses the term “prawn” only for the freshwater forms of palaemonids and “shrimp” for the marine penaeids.

In the United Kingdom, the word “prawn” is more common on menus than “shrimp”, while the opposite is the case in North America.

The term “prawn” is also loosely used to describe any large shrimp, especially those that come 15 (or fewer) to the pound (such as “king prawns”, yet sometimes known as “jumbo shrimp”).

Australia and some other Commonwealth nations follow this British usage to an even greater extent, using the word “prawn” almost exclusively.

When Australian comedian Paul Hogan used the phrase, “I’ll slip an extra shrimp on the barbie for you” in an American television advertisement, it was intended to make what he was saying easier for his American audience to understand, and was thus a deliberate distortion of what an Australian would typically say.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prawn

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Categories: Animal, General Knowledge
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