Home > General Knowledge, History > 277/365 – Rajiv Gandhi Assassination

277/365 – Rajiv Gandhi Assassination

The assassination of Rajiv Gandhi, the ex-Prime Minister of India, occurred as a result of a suicide bombing in Sriperumbudur in Tamil Nadu, India on 21 May 1991.

At least 14 others were also killed. It was carried out by Thenmozhi Rajaratnam, also known as Dhanu. The attack was blamed on the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, a separatist terrorist organization from Sri Lanka; at the time India was embroiled, through the Indian Peace Keeping Force, in the Sri Lankan Civil War.

Subsequent accusations of conspiracy have been addressed by two commissions of inquiry and have brought down at least one national government. The LTTE, however, denied responsibility.

Assassination

About two hours after arriving in Madras (now Chennai), Rajiv Gandhi was driven by motorcade in a white Ambassador car to Sriperumbudur, stopping along the way at a few other election campaigning venues.

When he reached a campaign rally in Sriperumbudur, he got out of his car and began to walk towards the dais where he would deliver a speech.

Along the way, he was garlanded by many well-wishers, Congress party workers and school children. At 22:21 the assassin, Dhanu, approached and greeted him.

She then bent down to touch his feet and detonated an RDX explosive laden belt tucked below her dress. Gandhi and 14 others were killed in the explosion that followed.

The assassination was caught on film by a local photographer, whose camera and film was found at the site though the cameraman himself died in the blast.

Investigation

Following the assassination, the investigation was given to a Special Investigation Team (SIT), headed by DIG Radha Vinod Raju.

Perpetrator

The assassination was carried out by the LTTE suicide bomber Thenmozhi Rajaratnam also known as Dhanu. Later, the real name of the suicide bomber came to be known as Gayatri.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assassination_of_Rajiv_Gandhi

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Categories: General Knowledge, History
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