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231/365 – 2004 Tsunami

April 17, 2012 Leave a comment

The December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was caused by an earthquake that is thought to have had the energy of 23,000 atomic bombs.

The epicenter of the 9.0 magnitude quake was under the Indian Ocean near the west coast of the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

The violent movement of sections of the Earth’s crusts known as tectonic plates displaced an enormous amount of water, sending powerful shock waves in every direction.

The tectonic plates in this area had been pushing against each other, building pressure for thousands of years – they continue to do so and will likely cause underwater earthquakes and tsunamis in the future.

The shifting of the earth’s plates in the Indian Ocean on December 26, 2004 caused a rupture more than 600 miles long, displacing the seafloor above the rupture by perhaps 10 yards horizontally and several yards vertically. That doesn’t sound like much, but the trillions of tons of rock that were moved along hundreds of miles caused the planet to shudder with the largest magnitude earthquake in 40 years.

Within hours of the earthquake, killer waves radiating from the epicenter slammed into the coastline of 11 Indian Ocean countries, damaging countries from east Africa to Thailand.

Despite a lag of up to several hours between the earthquake and the impact of the tsunami, nearly all of the victims were taken completely by surprise because there were no tsunami warning systems in the Indian Ocean to detect tsunamis or to warn the general populace living around the ocean.

By the end of the day of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, it had already killed 150,000 people. The final death toll was 283,000.

The Indian Ocean tsunami traveled as far as 3,000 miles to Africa and still arrived with sufficient force to kill people and destroy property.

Many people in Indonesian reported that they saw animals fleeing for high ground minutes before the tsunami arrived – very few animal bodies were found afterward.

The risk of famine and epidemic diseases was extremely high immediately following the tsunami – bodies rotting in the tropical heat contaminated food and water sources.

Source: http://www.dosomething.org/tipsandtools/11-facts-about-2004-indian-ocean-tsunami

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228/365 – Bay of Bengal

April 14, 2012 Leave a comment

Location: South Asia

Ocean type: bay

Primary sources: Indian Ocean

Basin countries: India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Myanmar, Indonesia, Malaysia, Sri Lanka

Max length: 2,090 km; c.1,300 mi

Max width: 1,610 km; 1,000 mi

Surface area: 2,172,000 km²

Average depth: 2,600 m ; 8,500 feet

Max depth: 4,694 m ; 15,400 feet

The Bay of Bengal, the largest bay in the world, forms the northeastern part of the Indian Ocean. Roughly triangular in shape, it is bordered mostly by India and Sri Lanka to the west, Bangladesh to the north, and Burma (Myanmar) and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands to the east.

 The Bay of Bengal occupies an area of 2,172,000 km². A number of large rivers – the Padma (a distributary of the Ganges), Meghna (a distributary of the Brahmaputra), Jamuna (a branch of the Brahmaputra), Ayeyarwady, Godavari, Mahanadi, Krishna and Kaveri – flow into the Bay of Bengal.

Among the important ports are Cuddalore, Ennore, Chennai, Karaikal, Pondicherry, Tuticorin, Kakinada, Machilipatnam, Vishakhapatnam, Gangavaram, Krishnapatnam, Paradip, Kolkata, Mongla, Chittagong and Yangon.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay_of_Bengal

195/365 – Facts About Rain

March 12, 2012 Leave a comment

1. The umbrella was originally invented to protect people from the hot sun.

2. Rain drops can fall at speeds of about 22 miles an hour.

3. Rain starts off as ice or snow crystals at cloud level.

4. Light rain is classified as being no more then 0.10 inchese of rain an hour.

5. Heavy rain is classified as being more then 0.30 inches of rain an hour.

6. Louisiana is the wettest state in the U.S, which receoved an annual rainfall of 56 inches.

7. Rain drops range in size from 0.02 inches to about .031 inches.

8. Rain drops do not fall in a tear drop shape, they originally fall in the shave of a flat oval.

9. Rain that freezes before it hits the ground is known as frozen rain.

10. Rain is recycled water that evaporated from our worlds lakes, rivers, oceans, seas etc.

Source: http://www.infobarrel.com/10_Facts_about_Rain#ixzz1oulFNlcT

Categories: General Knowledge, Nature

192/365 – Mango

The mango is known as the ‘king of fruit’ throughout the world.

The Mango is a member of the cashew family of flowering plants; other species include the pistachio tree and poison ivy.

The name ‘mango’ is derived from the Tamil word ‘mangkay’ or ‘man-gay’. When the Portuguese traders settled in Western India they adopted the name as ‘manga’.

Mangos originated in East India, Burma and the Andaman Islands bordering the Bay of Bengal. Persian traders took the mango into the middle east and Africa, from there the Portuguese brought it to Brazil and the West Indies. Mango cultivars arrived in Florida in the 1830’s and in California in the 1880’s.

The Mango tree is a symbol of love.

Mango leaves are used at weddings to ensure the couple bear plenty of children (though it is only the birth of the male child that is celebrated – again by hanging mango leaves outside the house).

Many Southeast Asian kings and nobles had their own mango groves; with private cultivars being sources of great pride and social standing, hence began the custom of sending gifts of the choicest mangoes.

Burning of mango wood, leaves and debris is not advised – toxic fumes can cause serious irritation to eyes and lungs.

Mango leaves are considered toxic and can kill cattle or other grazing livestock.

Mangos are bursting with protective nutrients. The vitamin content depends upon the variety and maturity of the fruit, when the mango is green the amount of vitamin C is higher, as it ripens the amount of beta carotene (vitamin A) increases.

There are over 20 million metric tons of mangos grown throughout the tropical and sub-tropical world. The leading mango producer is India, with very little export as most are consumed within the country. Mexico and China compete for second place, followed by Pakistan and Indonesia. Thailand, Nigeria, Brazil, Philippines and Haiti follow in order.

The fruit of the mango is called a Drupe – consisting of the mesocarp (edible fleshy part) and endocarp (large woody, flattened pit).

The mango is a member of the Anachardiaceae family. Other distant relatives include the cashew, pistachio, Jamaica plum, poison ivy and poison oak.

The over 1,000 known mango cultivars are derived from two strains of mango seed – monoembryonic (single embryo) and polyembryonic (multiple embryo). Monoembryonic hails from the Indian (original) strain of mango, polyembryonic from the Indochinese.

Dermatitis can result from contact with the resinous latex sap that drips from the stem end when mangos are harvested. The mango fruit skin is not considered edible.

Mangiferin – rich in splenocytes, found in the stem bark of the mango tree has purported potent immunomodulatory characteristics – believed to inhibit tumor growth in early and late stages.

Mangoes contain as much vitamin C as an orange.

To choose a Mango gently squeeze the ‘nose’ of the fruit. If there is slight give then the mango is ripe. Color is not the best indicator of ripeness.

A Mango stored at 55 degrees will last for up to two weeks. Do not refrigerate.

Mangoes are some of the best sources of beta carotene; they contain 20 percent more than cantaloupe and 50 percent more than apricots.

Categories: Food, Nature

185/365 – Copper

Facts about the Definition of the Element Copper

A ductile, malleable, reddish-brown metallic element that is an excellent conductor of heat and electricity and is widely used for electrical wiring, water piping, and corrosion-resistant parts, either pure or in alloys such as brass and bronze. The most common uses of Copper are in Copper sulfate, Hammered copper, Tubing, pipes – Plumbing, Wire, Electromagnets, Statues, Watt’s steam engine, Vacuum tubes, Musical instruments, Component of coins, Cookware and Cutlery. A Copper Reaction involves a process in which Copper is mixed with another substance which react to form something else.

Interesting Facts about the Origin and Meaning of the element name Copper

The name originates from the Latin word cyprium, after the island of Cyprus. Copper was associated with the goddess named Aphrodite / Venus in Greek and Roman mythology. The island of Cyprus was sacred to the goddess. In alchemy, the symbol for copper was also the symbol for the planet Venus. In Greek times, the metal was known by the name Chalkos. In Roman times, it became known as Cyprium because so much of it was mined in Cyprus.

Facts about the Classification of the Element Copper

Copper is classified as a “Transition Metal” which are located in Groups 3 – 12 of the Periodic Table. An Element classified as a Transition Metals is ductile, malleable, and able to conduct electricity and heat.

Occurrence of the element Copper in the Atmosphere

Obtained from chalcopyrite, coveline, chalcosine

Common Uses of Copper

Copper sulfate
Hammered copper
Tubing, pipes – Plumbing
Wire
Sheets
Electromagnets
Statues
Watt’s steam engine
Vacuum tubes
Musical instruments
Component of coins
Cookware
Cutlery

The Properties of the Element Copper

Name of Element : Copper
Symbol of Element : Cu
Atomic Number of Copper : 29
Atomic Mass: 63.546 amu
Melting Point: 1083.0 °C – 1356.15 °K
Boiling Point: 2567.0 °C – 2840.15 °K
Number of Protons/Electrons in Copper : 29
Number of Neutrons in Copper : 35
Crystal Structure: Cubic
Density @ 293 K: 8.96 g/cm3
Color of Copper : red / orange / brown

Source: http://www.facts-about.org.uk/science-element-copper.htm

Categories: Nature, Science

185/365 – Copper

Facts about the Definition of the Element Copper

A ductile, malleable, reddish-brown metallic element that is an excellent conductor of heat and electricity and is widely used for electrical wiring, water piping, and corrosion-resistant parts, either pure or in alloys such as brass and bronze. The most common uses of Copper are in Copper sulfate, Hammered copper, Tubing, pipes – Plumbing, Wire, Electromagnets, Statues, Watt’s steam engine, Vacuum tubes, Musical instruments, Component of coins, Cookware and Cutlery. A Copper Reaction involves a process in which Copper is mixed with another substance which react to form something else.

Interesting Facts about the Origin and Meaning of the element name Copper

The name originates from the Latin word cyprium, after the island of Cyprus. Copper was associated with the goddess named Aphrodite / Venus in Greek and Roman mythology. The island of Cyprus was sacred to the goddess. In alchemy, the symbol for copper was also the symbol for the planet Venus. In Greek times, the metal was known by the name Chalkos. In Roman times, it became known as Cyprium because so much of it was mined in Cyprus.

Facts about the Classification of the Element Copper

Copper is classified as a “Transition Metal” which are located in Groups 3 – 12 of the Periodic Table. An Element classified as a Transition Metals is ductile, malleable, and able to conduct electricity and heat.

Occurrence of the element Copper in the Atmosphere

Obtained from chalcopyrite, coveline, chalcosine

Common Uses of Copper

Copper sulfate
Hammered copper
Tubing, pipes – Plumbing
Wire
Sheets
Electromagnets
Statues
Watt’s steam engine
Vacuum tubes
Musical instruments
Component of coins
Cookware
Cutlery

The Properties of the Element Copper

Name of Element : Copper
Symbol of Element : Cu
Atomic Number of Copper : 29
Atomic Mass: 63.546 amu
Melting Point: 1083.0 °C – 1356.15 °K
Boiling Point: 2567.0 °C – 2840.15 °K
Number of Protons/Electrons in Copper : 29
Number of Neutrons in Copper : 35
Crystal Structure: Cubic
Density @ 293 K: 8.96 g/cm3
Color of Copper : red / orange / brown

Source: http://www.facts-about.org.uk/science-element-copper.htm

Categories: Nature, Science

182/365 – Tides

February 28, 2012 Leave a comment

The gravitational force of the moon is one ten-millionth that of earth, but when you combine other forces such as the earth’s centrifugal force created by its spin, you get tides.

The sun’s gravitational force on the earth is only 46 percent that of the moon. Making the moon the single most important factor for the creation of tides.

The sun’s gravity also produces tides. But since the forces are smaller, as compared to the
moon, the effects are greatly decreased.

Tides are not caused by the direct pull of the moon’s gravity. The moon is pulling upwards on the water while the earth is pulling downward. Slight advantage to the moon and thus we have tides.

Whenever the Moon, Earth and Sun are aligned, the gravitational pull of the sun adds to that of the moon causing maximum tides.

Spring tides happen when the sun and moon are on the same side of the earth (New Moon) or when the sun and moon are on opposite sides of the earth (Full Moon).

When the Moon is at first quarter or last quarter phase (meaning that it is located at right angles to the Earth-Sun line), the Sun and Moon interfere with each other in producing tidal bulges and tides are generally weaker; these are called neap tides.

Spring tides and neap tide levels are about 20% higher or lower than average.

The surf grows when it approaches a beach, and the tide increases. In bays and estuaries,
this effect is amplified. (In the Bay of Fundy, tides have a range of 44.6 ft.)

The highest tides in the world are at the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia, Canada.

Because the earth rotates on its axis the moon completes one orbit in our sky every 25 hours (Not to be confused with moon’s 27 day orbit around the earth), we get two tidal peaks as well as two tidal troughs. These events are separated by about 12 hours.

Since the moon moves around the Earth, it is not always in the same place at the same time each day.

So, each day, the times for high and low tides change by 50 minutes.

The type of gravitational force that causes tides is know as “Tractive” force.

Source: http://surfingsantacruz.com/facts_about_tides

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Categories: Nature